953 Dixwell Ave Hamden, CT 06514
Tel:  (203) 745-4244 Fax: (203) 821-7999

 

 

 

Hamden Dentist, New Haven Dentist. Dr. Kunal Patel provides Family Dentist, Restorative dentist, Pediatric Dentist, Kids Dentist, Emergency Dentist, Affordable Dentist, Tooth Pain, Teeth Whitening, Teeth Cleaning, Root canal Dentist to Hamden, CT, New Haven, CT, West Haven, CT, East Haven, CT, Wallingford, CT, Shelton, CT, Woodbridge, CT.  Dentist providing gentle quality dentistry, Family Dentist, Kids Dentist in Hamden, CT, New Haven, CT, West Haven, CT, East Haven, CT, Wallingford, CT, Shelton, CT, Woodbridge, CT.

 

© 2013 Hamden Dental Care 

Healthy Smile, Healthy you

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Wednesday: 9:00 A.M - 6:00 P.M

Saturday: 9:00 A.M - 2:00 P.M

Friday 9:00 A.M - 6:00 P.M

Thursday: 9:00 A.M - 6:00 P.M

Tuesday: 9:00 A.M - 6:00 P.M

Monday: 9:00 A.M - 6:00 P.M

Sunday: Close

Connect Family Dental

Babies and kids Teeth

Dental Home By age 1

One Baby Tooth
+
One Pediatric Dental Visit
=
Zero Cavities
 ¨The AAPD recommends establishing a ¨Dental Home¨ for your child by 1 years of age¨.

Creating a dental routine early can ensure a lifetime of healthy smiles for your child. Baby teeth are important teeth, and cavity prevention starts even before the first tooth appears. By teaching your children the benefits of brushing and flossing, you are putting them on a be Healthy for Life. Teaching your child good oral hygiene habits early can lead to a lifelong healthy smile, but did  you know that just because babies don’t have any visible teeth, doesn’t mean they can’t get cavities? A baby’s 20 primary teeth are already present in the jaws at birth. And those baby teeth that begin coming through the gums around 6 months help set the stage for future smiles by keeping space in the jaw for adult teeth.

Baby teeth matter

When a baby tooth is lost too early, the permanent teeth can drift into the empty space and make it difficult for other adult teeth to find room when they come in.This can make teeth crooked or crowded. That’s why starting infants off with good oral care can help protect their teeth for decades to come. The ADA recommends that parents take children to a dentist no later than their first birthday and then intervals recommended by their dentist.

Dr. Kunal Patel performs dental care services in New Haven ,CT, Hamden, CT, West Haven, CT, East Haven, CT, Wallingford, CT, Shelton, CT: Teeth Chart, baby teeth eruption sequences, dental visits, start early. Here at Connect Family Dental With Dr. Patel and his Dental Staff, we accept all insurance (Deltal Dental, Cigna, Anthem, Husky, etc.)

Start Early

Your child’s baby teeth are at risk for decay as soon as they first appear—which is typically around
age 6 months. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay.
It most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected. In some cases,
infants and toddlers experience decay so severe that their teeth cannot be saved and need to be
removed. The good news is that tooth decay is preventable! Most children have a full set of 20
primary teeth by the time they are 3-years-old. As your child grows, their jaws also grow, making
room for their permanent teeth.

Cleaning Your Child’s Teeth  

  • Begin cleaning your baby’s mouth during the first few days after birth by wiping the gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth. As soon as teeth appear, decay can occur.

  • When your child’s teeth begin to come in, brush them gently with a child-size toothbrush and water. A baby’s front four teeth usually push through the gums at
    about 6 months of age, although some children don’t have their first tooth until 12
    or 14 months.

  • For children older than 2, brush their teeth with a pea-sized amount of fluoride 
    toothpaste. Be sure they spit out the toothpaste. (Ask your child's dentist or physician if you are considering using fluoride toothpaste before age 2.)

  • Until you’re comfortable that your child can brush on his or her own, continue to brush your child's teeth twice a day with a child-size toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. When your child has two teeth that touch, you should begin flossing their teeth daily.

Dr. Kunal Patel performs dental care services in New Haven ,CT, Hamden, CT, West Haven, CT, East Haven, CT, Wallingford, CT, Shelton, CT:  Baby teeth, prevent cavities, cleaning gums, dental home by 1. Here at Connect Family Dental With Dr. Patel and his Dental Staff, we accept all insurance (Deltal Dental, Cigna, Anthem, Husky, etc.) baby teeth, baby oral care, primar teeth, first tooth, teething, drooling, pacifier, sucking thumb, baby's first dentist appointment, baby see the dentist, tongue tide, baby can't latch
Dr. Kunal Patel performs dental care services in New Haven ,CT, Hamden, CT, West Haven, CT, East Haven, CT, Wallingford, CT, Shelton, CT: Teething, Ache gums, Baby teeth, toddler teeth, oral health, teething from age 6months to 3 years. Here at Connect Family Dental With Dr. Patel and his Dental Staff, we accept all insurance (Deltal Dental, Cigna, Anthem, Husky, etc.) baby crying, baby food, baby first food, baby cranky

 Teething  

  Teething is one of the first rituals of life. Although newborns usually have no visible teeth, most baby teeth begin to appear generally about six months after birth. During the first few years of your child’s life, all 20 baby teeth will push through the gums and most children will have their full set of these teeth in place by age 3. A baby’s front four teeth usually erupt or push through the gums at about six months of age, although some children don’t have their first tooth until 12 or 14 months. As their teeth erupt, some babies may become fussy, sleepless and irritable, lose their appetite or drool more than usual. Diarrhea, rashes and a fever are not normal symptoms for a teething baby. If your infant has a fever or diarrhea while teething or continues to be cranky and uncomfortable, call your physician.

First Dental Visit  

As soon as your child’s first tooth appears, it’s time to schedule a dental visit. The ADA recommends that the first dental visit take place within six months after the first tooth appears, but no later than a child’s first birthday. Don’t wait for them to start school or until there's an emergency. Get your child comfortable today with good mouth healthy habits. Although the first visit is mainly for the dentist to examine your child’s mouth and to check growth and development, it’s also about your child being comfortable. To make the visit positive:

  • Consider making a morning appointment when children tend to be rested and cooperative.

  • Keep any anxiety or concerns you have to yourself. Children can pick up on your emotions, so emphasize the positive.

  • Never use a dental visit as a punishment or threat.

  • Never bribe your child.

  • Talk with your child about visiting the dentist.

During this visit, you can expect the dentist to:  

  • Inspect for oral injuries, cavities or other problems.

  • Let you know if your child is at risk of developing tooth decay.

  • Clean your child’s teeth and provide tips for daily care.

  • Discuss teething, pacifier use, or finger/thumbsucking habits.

  • Discuss treatment, if needed, and schedule the next check-up.

Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in all water sources, including oceans, rivers and lakes. Fluoride is also added to some community tap water, toothpastes and mouth rinses. Infants and toddlers who do not receive an adequate amount of fluoride may be at an increased risk for tooth decay since fluoride helps make tooth enamel more resistant to decay. It also helps repair weakened enamel. Bottled water may not contain fluoride; therefore, children who regularly drink bottled water or unfluoridated tap water may be missing the benefits of fluoride. If you are not sure if your tap water has fluoride, contact your local or state health department or water supplier.
Note: Discuss your child’s fluoride needs with your dentist or pediatrician. They may recommend a fluoride supplement if you live in an area where the community water is not fluoridated.

Fluoride

Pacifiers 

Infants and young children may suck on thumbs, other fingers or pacifiers. Pacifiers dipped in sugar, honey, juice or sweetened drinks, can lead to tooth decay. Tooth decay can also begin when cavity-causing bacteria pass from saliva in a mother or caregiver’s mouth to the infant. When the mother or caregiver puts the baby’s feeding spoon in her mouth, or cleans a pacifier in her mouth, the bacteria can be passed to the baby.